Introverts: a minority in the regular population but a majority in the gifted population

I found a wonderful, wondrous article about being an Introvert. You should all read it — especially those of you who are extroverts — so you can better understand the introverts in your life! There are so many choice lines in it, that I can hardly pick just one to include as an excerpt…

Do you know someone who needs hours alone every day? Who loves quiet conversations about feelings or ideas, and can give a dynamite presentation to a big audience, but seems awkward in groups and maladroit at small talk? Who has to be dragged to parties and then needs the rest of the day to recuperate? Who growls or scowls or grunts or winces when accosted with pleasantries by people who are just trying to be nice? …If you answered yes to these questions, chances are that you have an introvert on your hands.

Many actors, I’ve read, are introverts, and many introverts, when socializing, feel like actors.

Extroverts are easy for introverts to understand, because extroverts spend so much of their time working out who they are in voluble, and frequently inescapable, interaction with other people. They are as inscrutable as puppy dogs. But the street does not run both ways. Extroverts have little or no grasp of introversion. They assume that company, especially their own, is always welcome.

[Introverts] tend to think before talking, whereas extroverts tend to think by talking, which is why their meetings never last less than six hours.

Read the rest

Advertisements

One thought on “Introverts: a minority in the regular population but a majority in the gifted population

  1. Some theories on the development of intelligence postulate that language does not develop because of our intelligence, but rather our intelligence develops from our language. Speaking grows our brains. As one who makes his living from talking, I find this a comforting theory and I intend to tell it to everyone I talk to, disregarding the disconcerting evidence that some of the brightest people who ever lived didn’t speak at all until they were five.

Comments are closed.