Healing

So the doctor looked at my arm today — for the first time since last Wednesday. Actually, a doctor was unavailable, so a “physicians assistant” took a look. I’m not sure what a physicians assistant or “PA” means, but if my experience is any indicator, a PA must be someone who is too clumsy, brusque or untalented to make it as a doctor.

First he took a pair of tweezers and yanked at any loose skin, scab or foam he could find in my larger wounds, then he took a tongue depressor, covered it in antibacterial gel and slapped it onto the wounds and rubbed it around while I tried not to scream. Then for his grand finale he took the stitches in the top of my arm out — the best part was when he went to grab my arm for leverage, and jammed his fingers right into my wounds. “Oops, sorry,” he said as he grabbed, no less gently, a little higher up the arm. It was a couple hours after my appointment before I was able to stop shivering in pain.

He did have an actual doctor come in to review his work, and that doctor has referred me to a plastic surgeon to find out if I should have some skin grafted on over the holes in my arm. So that’ll be fun…

I’m also taking some time this week to heal in other ways. After a 94 hour work week, hot on the heels of a winter retreat/hospital visit, I am realising that I can’t successfully do everything. So this week I’m going to work just one job, and put in some significant effort to try and earn this raise my boss just gave me. And at then end of the day I’m going to go home, and spend some time with my wife, and with my son, and with my God. Cause I haven’t had a lot of time to talk to any of them in the past little while.

I know there are mixed feelings on me taking this vacation (what does it mean when I think a “vacation” is only working one job?) and some people aren’t 100% behind me taking some time to recover. Those people can talk to my “out of office” message!

To everyone else who is with us in prayer and in encouragement, this has been an incredibly challenging and re-shaping year for us already — we’ve had some huge changes in our lives, and we’ve done our best not to break stride or let anyone down while we figured out how to make all these things work — but now we need some time to regroup, and we could really use your love and support while we do that…

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How to use two or more WRT54Gs to extend a WiFi network

wrt54g.jpgWDS is clumsy and hard to configure.

WiFi repeaters cost more than a router.

If you have sufficient wired network, but want to extend the range of an existing wireless router over a large area, the simplest, cheapest way to do it is with your garden variety Linksys WRT54G routers — you don’t even need to flash them to the Linux firmware.

I found these instructions after searching all over the Internets, and I don’t remember the source, so I’ve got to re-post them for my own reference — and that of anyone else who wants to do this.

  • Connect a computer to the new, second router. Enter the router admin page using your browser.
  • Disable the DHCP server
  • Change the local IP address to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but below the range assigned by it’s DHCP server.
    • For example, your primary router probably has a local address of 192.168.1.1 and assigns IPs in the range 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150. In this case, a safe IP for you to use in your second router would be 192.168.1.2 — this also makes it easy to find later!
  • Apply the changes. (some reboots may be necessary)
  • Plug your wired network into one of the standard LAN ports on the new router — do not use the Internet/WAN port.
  • Reconnect to the admin page using the new IP address you just gave it.
  • Find the Advanced Routing page and change the router’s operating mode from Gateway to Router.
  • Configure the wireless settings of the new router to exactly match the wireless settings of your primary router (including SSID and security) but use a different wireless channel. Most sites recommend spacing out your channels by 3 or 4 to avoid interference and bleed.
    • For example, if your primary router is providing wireless on Channel 6, your secondary router could safely use Channel 2 or Channel 10.

Once these steps are done, laptops will be able to roam freely between access points, and will switch, without interruption, to the strongest available signal. I’ve used this successfully with 2-3 routers at both our campuses, and have had a strong, stable wireless network since.

How to use two or more WRT54Gs to extend a WiFi network

WDS is clumsy and hard to configure.

WiFi repeaters cost more than a router.

If you have sufficient wired network, but want to extend the range of an existing wireless router over a large area, the simplest, cheapest way to do it is with your garden variety Linksys WRT54G routers — you don’t even need to flash them to the Linux firmware.

I derived these instructions after searching all over the Internets, and I don’t remember the source, so I’ve got to re-post them for my own reference — and that of anyone else who wants to do this.

  • Connect a computer to the new, second router. Enter the router admin page using your browser.
  • Disable the DHCP server
  • Change the local IP address to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but below the range assigned by it’s DHCP server.
    • For example, your primary router probably has a local address of 192.168.1.1 and assigns IPs in the range 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150. In this case, a safe IP for you to use in your second router would be 192.168.1.2 — this also makes it easy to find later!
  • Apply the changes. (some reboots may be necessary)
  • Plug your wired network into one of the standard LAN ports on the new router — do not use the Internet/WAN port.
  • Reconnect to the admin page using the new IP address you just gave it.
  • Find the Advanced Routing page and change the router’s operating mode from Gateway to Router.
  • Configure the wireless settings of the new router to exactly match the wireless settings of your primary router (including SSID and security) but use a different wireless channel. Most sites recommend spacing out your channels by 3 or 4 to avoid interference and bleed.
    • For example, if your primary router is providing wireless on Channel 6, your secondary router could safely use Channel 2 or Channel 10.

Once these steps are done, laptops will be able to roam freely between access points, and will switch, without interruption, to the strongest available signal. I’ve used this successfully with 2-3 routers, and have had a strong, stable wireless network since.